Jeremy Hill

By Emma Whitford

Jeremy Hill, a rising senior at Ohio University, is returning for a second summer to the Dow Jones News Fund (DJNF)/American City Business Journal’s (ACBJ) business reporting program. He grew up in Lancaster, Ohio, and spent the past summer interning at the business journal Columbus Business First. He is excited to return to the journal June. 

Every summer, DJNF sponsors internships for college students to work at various news outlets across the United States. ACBJ partners for one of the two DJNF business reporting programs and leads ten students through a crash course at New York University to learn the ins and outs of business journalism before sending them to their respective journals. This summer, students will be led by Paul Glader – a journalism and writing professor at The King’s College – and learning from journalists at news outlets including the Wall Street Journal, ProPublica and CBS.

“I'm eager to learn more about how to analyze businesses on paper. Floundering businesses don't seem to be keen on talking candidly to reporters. I want to learn how better to get straight answers myself through public records, financial statements and data,” Hill said. “I'm really looking forward to listening to Andrea Fuller from the Wall Street Journal speak.”

At Ohio University, Hill majors in journalism and has been writing for the student newspaper, The Post, since the summer before his freshman year. Last year he served as the paper’s blogs editor. 

“My niche since my sophomore year has been numbers – budgets, businesses, etc. Those are my favorite topics to write about because I think I can effectively communicate boring and complicated issues,” Hill said.

His favorite article is one that he wrote this past spring about Ohio University's endowment dollars being traced back to big oil, tobacco and private prison companies. 

“It's the best story I've written because it's fair, enterprise reporting on an issue many community members don't know about but probably should. Much of the response to the story was anger, which I think means I did something right.”

The article highlights Hill’s ability to write clearly and plainly about important, complex topics, which Assistant Professor at the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism Thomas Suddes mentioned as two of Hill’s particular strengths.

“Jeremy’s strengths as a reporter are his capacity to unpack complex topics, and then write about those topics in terms that the audience can understand,” Suddes said. “It’s sometimes claimed that there are two types of journalists – those who know how to report, those who know how to write. But there also journalists who can do both: And Jeremy Hill is one who can do both.”

Suddes believes that these skills are critical in business journalism. 

“I believe the key skill for a business reporter is to explain how things really work, that is, to dissect an enterprise or economic phenomenon in concrete terms, rather than abstractly. Plain, declarative, clear – those are the attributes, in reporting as well as writing, for which a business reporter should strive,” Suddes said. “People say business and economics are mysteries. No; life is a mystery. In contrast, when a business or economic story conveys mystery rather than clarity, that's because a reporter and his or her editor failed to keep the audience in mind.”  

The DJNF/ACBJ business reporting program is a perfect fit for Hill. Post-college, he plans on pursuing a career in business reporting. 

“During my first year in college, while being bombarded by professors and peers saying journalism was dying, I decided I would work hard at developing business journalism skills because it's a growing and important field,” Hill said. “Business reporting is legitimately, concretely valuable. That draws me in.”


Jeremy Hill, a rising senior at Ohio University, is returning for a second summer to the Dow Jones News Fund (DJNF)/American City Business Journal’s (ACBJ) business reporting program. He grew up in Lancaster, Ohio, and spent the past summer interning at the business journal Columbus Business First. He is excited to return to the journal June. 

Every summer, DJNF sponsors internships for college students to work at various news outlets across the United States. ACBJ partners for one of the two DJNF business reporting programs and leads ten students through a crash course at New York University to learn the ins and outs of business journalism before sending them to their respective journals. This summer, students will be led by Paul Glader – a journalism and writing professor at The King’s College – and learning from journalists at news outlets including the Wall Street Journal, ProPublica and CBS.

“I'm eager to learn more about how to analyze businesses on paper. Floundering businesses don't seem to be keen on talking candidly to reporters. I want to learn how better to get straight answers myself through public records, financial statements and data,” Hill said. “I'm really looking forward to listening to Andrea Fuller from the Wall Street Journal speak.”

At Ohio University, Hill majors in journalism and has been writing for the student newspaper, The Post, since the summer before his freshman year. Last year he served as the paper’s blogs editor. 

“My niche since my sophomore year has been numbers – budgets, businesses, etc. Those are my favorite topics to write about because I think I can effectively communicate boring and complicated issues,” Hill said.

His favorite article is one that he wrote this past spring about Ohio University's endowment dollars being traced back to big oil, tobacco and private prison companies. 

“It's the best story I've written because it's fair, enterprise reporting on an issue many community members don't know about but probably should. Much of the response to the story was anger, which I think means I did something right.”

The article highlights Hill’s ability to write clearly and plainly about important, complex topics, which Assistant Professor at the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism Thomas Suddes mentioned as two of Hill’s particular strengths.

“Jeremy’s strengths as a reporter are his capacity to unpack complex topics, and then write about those topics in terms that the audience can understand,” Suddes said. “It’s sometimes claimed that there are two types of journalists – those who know how to report, those who know how to write. But there also journalists who can do both: And Jeremy Hill is one who can do both.”

Suddes believes that these skills are critical in business journalism. 

“I believe the key skill for a business reporter is to explain how things really work, that is, to dissect an enterprise or economic phenomenon in concrete terms, rather than abstractly. Plain, declarative, clear – those are the attributes, in reporting as well as writing, for which a business reporter should strive,” Suddes said. “People say business and economics are mysteries. No; life is a mystery. In contrast, when a business or economic story conveys mystery rather than clarity, that's because a reporter and his or her editor failed to keep the audience in mind.”  

The DJNF/ACBJ business reporting program is a perfect fit for Hill. Post-college, he plans on pursuing a career in business reporting. 

“During my first year in college, while being bombarded by professors and peers saying journalism was dying, I decided I would work hard at developing business journalism skills because it's a growing and important field,” Hill said. “Business reporting is legitimately, concretely valuable. That draws me in.”